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Raiders 4th MRRB / MRT4060


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#1 Raider

Raider

    Marine Raider

  • "Raiders"
  • PipPipPip
  • 3 901 сообщений

Отправлено 17 Январь 2017 - 21:51

US Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command

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Airsoft based reenachment of
MARSOC Marine Raiders
(Timeframe 2013+)

Member of 4th Marine Raiders Reenactment Battalion

MARSOC Marine Raiders
The Marine Corps is the nation’s expeditionary force, ready to respond to any crisis, anywhere. Marines have always fought our nation’s small wars, its irregular wars—the wars of the future. MARSOC Marines are Marines first, and they build on their Corps legacy: MARSOC operators go forward to win the war before it starts.


RAIDERS TEAM PATCH

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"Always Faithful, Always Forward"

#2 Raider

Raider

    Marine Raider

  • "Raiders"
  • PipPipPip
  • 3 901 сообщений

Отправлено 15 Апрель 2018 - 17:56

MARSOC’s core activities are:
(Legend for airsoft and milsim games)


  • Direct Action:

Conducting short strikes and small-scale offensive actions to seize, destroy, capture, recover, or inflict damage in hostile or denied areas.

  • Special Reconnaissance:

Acquire information about the capabilities, intentions, and activities of an enemy.

  • Preparation of the Environment:

Collection intelligence and prepare for future operations at the direction of command.

  • Security Force Assistance:

Supportig the security forces of allied foreign governments to achieve operational objectives the our shares.

  • Counterterrorism:

Prevention, deter, and respond to terrorism.

  • Foreign Internal Defense:

Training and other assistance to foreign governments and their militaries to enable them to pro vide for their national security.

  • Counterinsurgency:

In concert with allied governments, we conduct military, paramilitary, political, economic, psychological, and civic action operations to defeat insurgency.
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"Always Faithful, Always Forward"

#3 Raider

Raider

    Marine Raider

  • "Raiders"
  • PipPipPip
  • 3 901 сообщений

Отправлено 25 Декабрь 2018 - 17:59

The Marine Raider Regiment, formerly known as the Marine Special Operations Regiment (MSOR) is named in commemoration of their elite World War II predecessors, the Marine Raiders. The modern Raiders are a special operations force of the United States Marine Corps. The Regiment's organization was finalized in 2007 and contains three battalions, the First, Second, and Third Raider Battalions. The Marine Raider Regiment is the principal combat component of the Marine Corps Special Operations Command (MARSOC). The mission of the Regiment is to provide tailored military combat-skills training and advisor support for identified foreign forces in order to enhance their tactical capabilities and to prepare the environment as directed by USSOCOM as well as the capability to form the nucleus of a Joint Special Operations Task Force. Marines and Sailors of the MSOR, train, advise and assist friendly host nation forces – including naval and maritime military and paramilitary forces – to enable them to support their governments' internal security and stability, to counter subversion and to reduce the risk of violence from internal and external threats. MSOR deployments are coordinated by MARSOC, through USSOCOM, in accordance with engagement priorities for Overseas Contingency Operations. THE PATCH: — In the Raider Room at Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command headquarters here, the focal point is unmistakable: the iconic World War II Raiders emblem on a banner, featuring a menacing skull surrounded by five stars arrayed in a "Southern Cross" on a midnight blue background. But while MARSOC has renamed its subordinate units for the Raiders, the command won't be adopting the famous skull logo, officials said. Maj. Gen. Joseph Osterman, MARSOC's commander. The decision was actually an acknowledgment of the Raiders' history and the multiple Marine units that can claim to be part of its lineage. "Those Raider battalions had a very specific emblem that was associated with them," Osterman said. "For MARSOC, it was really about taking on some pieces of that iconic emblem ... but to make it different." The legendary Raiders existed for a short, kinetic period between 1942 and 1944. During those years, the four Raider battalions conducted amphibious raids in the Asia-Pacific region as one of the first U.S. special operations contingents to fight in the war. They were later disbanded, and the battalions were re-purposed under 4th Marine Regiment. Those units remain active across the Marine Corps. The Marines' reconnaissance battalions can also lay claim to the Raiders bloodline. Prior to MARSOC's activation, the elite recon units were the Marines' closest connection to the special operations world. When MARSOC was created in 2006, its first personnel came from 1st and 2nd Force Reconnaissance Companies, which were briefly deactivated due to a lack of manpower. The Raiders influence can be seen in the insignias used by all these units. The 1st Battalion, 4th Marines emblem uses a version of the Raiders' Southern Cross, while the Marines' four reconnaissance battalions — three active and one Reserve — all feature an adaptation of the iconic skull. "The lineage actually goes back to 4th Marines when they took apart the Raider battalions and made another Marine regiment," Osterman said. "... So for our part, [we used] the commando knife and things like that, that they still used in World War II but we changed it just a little bit for being MARSOC rather than actually the Raider lineage." All of MARSOC's eight subordinate Raider units now feature the Southern Cross in their unit emblem; most also feature the upward-facing stiletto knife used by the original Raiders in the Pacific. Regardless of philosophy and lineage, however, MARSOC's Raiders will continue to sport the vintage skull patch, albeit in an unauthorized capacity. Though not formally approved for uniform use, MARSOC troops have made a habit of donning the patch during deployments. In February 2006 Marine Corps Special Operations Command (MARSOC) was created at Camp Lejeune North Carolina. The 1st and 2nd Marine Special Operations Battalions were created along with the Marine Special Operations Advisor Group (MSOAG, the predecessor of the MSOR). The majority of the combat personnel assigned to the two battalions were drawn from the Marine Corps Force Reconnaissance community. In April 2009, the MSOAG was redesignated the Marine Special Operations Regiment which then built in a new level of command by making 1st and 2nd MSOB subordinate, and redesignated MSOAG's operational Marines the 3rd Marine Special Operations Battalion. Each battalion consists of four companies and each company consists of four fourteen-man Marine Special Operations Teams. The 1st and 2nd Marine Raider Battalions are designated as DASR battalions. These MRBs focus on direct action raids and reconnaissance operations. The base unit of the MSOR is the fourteen-man Marine Special Operations Team (MSOT). Each 14-man MSOT is organized into three elements: a Headquarters (HQ) and two identical Tactical Squads. The HQ element consists of a Special Operations Officer Team Leader(SOO/Captain), Team Chief (Master Sergeant CSO), Operations SNCO (Gunnery Sergeant CSO), and a communication SNCO. Each Tactical Element consists of an Element Leader (Staff Sergeant CSO), three Critical Skills Operators (Sergeant/Corporal CSOs), and a Navy Special Amphibious Reconnaissance Corpsman (SARC). The organization allows a Team to operate on its own if needed, but maintains the ability to operate as part of a bigger unit such as an MSOC or SOTF, similar to Army Special Forces ODA/B. In 2014, it was announced that the Marine Special Operations Regiment and its units would be renamed Marine Raiders. However, due to administrative delays the renaming did not become official until June 19, 2015. The Marine's pilot program consisted of Det One deploying to Iraq with Navy SEALs from Naval Special Warfare Group 1 in 2004. Det One formed into the Marine Special Operations Battalions and deployed to Afghanistan in 2007. This deployment was marked with controversy when an element from Fox Company, 2nd Battalion was ambushed. The Marines were relieved from their operational charter in the country by an Army General from USSOCOM after claims were made that the Marines reacted inappropriately and caused excessive civilian casualties. The Marines were later found by a military tribunal to be cleared of wrongdoing. Shortly afterwards a deal was struck to send 2d MSOB to Helmand province in lieu of the eastern provinces. In late 2007, Golf Company 2d MSOB was sent to Helmand Province in Support of NATO operations. In September 2009 the 1st Battalion returned to Afghanistan, this time in command of a joint special operations task force in the northwest of the country. The MSOR was deployed supporting the Global War on Terrorism in December 2013 alongside the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) where they conducted various special operations missions, ranging from direct action, reconnaissance and other mission sets. Camp Lejeune, NC – Marines with U.S. Marine Corps Forces, Special Operations Command freefall during a High Altitude Low Opening (HALO) training exercise at an airfield in North Carolina, 8 July 2013. The Marines conducted the HALO jump to reinforce the skills employed to safely complete the exercise. Selection of the right personnel begins with a rigorous screening process designed to identify the right Marines for the right billet within MARSOC. Operational billets are open only to males. Marines wanting to serve as special operators must attend Assessment and Selection (A&S). All Marines are screened to ensure that the Marines joining MARSOC meet the established prerequisites for duty within the command. Screening takes place in three stages: record screening, physical screening, and a psychological and medical evaluation. Once a Marine is qualified through the MARSOC Recruiter's screening process, he will be assigned to the Assessment and Selection (A&S) Program. A&S is mentally and physically challenging. The program is conducted three times a year at an undisclosed location following the three-week Assessment and Selection Preparatory and Orientation Course. The three-week A&S Phase 1 course serves as the precursor to the roughly three-week Assessment and Selection Course (A&S), and the nine-month Individual Training Course (ITC), with the purpose of preparing MARSOC Critical Skills Operator candidates for the challenges of A&S. Aside from the physical training, which includes running, swimming and hiking, the course incorporates a mix of classroom instruction and practical application of basic Marine Corps knowledge and MARSOC and Special Operations Forces fundamentals. A&S Phase 1 completion does not guarantee selection. A&S is a mentally and physically challenging evaluation that enables MARSOC to identify Marines that have attributes compatible with special operations missions and the MARSOC way of life. A&S is highly competitive. The program is conducted three times a year at an undisclosed location following the three-week Assessment and Selection Preparatory and Orientation Course. The Individual Training Course is a physically and mentally challenging nine-month course designed to produce Critical Skills Operators who can operate across the spectrum of special operations in small teams under spartan conditions. ITC uses a building block approach; the training rigor will systematically increase to mimic the complexity and stresses of combat. During ITC students are under constant observation from the instructor cadre as well as their peers. ITC is broken down into four training phases: Phase 1 trains and evaluates students in the basic skill sets required of all special operators. Physical fitness, swimming and hand-to-hand combat are stressed in a PT program designed around endurance, functional fitness and amphibious training. This physical training program will continue throughout the course and has been designed to prepare the student for the unique demands of special operations. Field skills including: navigation; patrolling; Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE); and Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC). Mission planning, fire support training, and extensive communications round out the first phase. Phase 2 builds upon phase 1, the next phase teaches mission planning, fire support training, small boat operations and scout swimming, demolitions, photography and information collection/reporting and crew served weapons. A 9-day exercise, "Operation Raider Spirit", is run to evaluate the candidates in patrolling and combat operations. Following on from this, students are taught Special Reconnaissance skills on a 3-week course. The end of phase 2 is an exercise, "Operation Stingray Fury", which tests the ITC students in urban and rural reconnaissance. Phase 3 focuses on close quarters combat (CQB) operations, phase 3 of the ITC trains the student to high degrees of proficiency in rifle and pistol marksmanship (Combat Marksmanship), CQB Tactics, Techniques and Procedures, demolitions and urban combat skill sets employed by a frontline Marine Special Operations Team (MSOT). Phase 3, which lasts 5 weeks, culminates in a series of simulated raids against urban and rural targets in an exercise named "Operation Guile Strike". In the final phase, students will receive instruction on irregular warfare operations. The course culminates with "Operation Derna Bridge". Derna Bridge will require the student to use all of the skills mastered throughout the course while training, advising and operating with a Partner Nation/Irregular force. Newly graduated Marine special operators will be assigned to one of the three Marine Raider Battalions. All Marine special operators are required to undergo continual language training. However, based on ability, certain Marines will be selected for follow-on language training in an Advanced Linguistics Course. The training of Marine special operators does not end with ITC. Marines will continue training at their assigned battalion for another 18 months. In addition, the MSOS offers advanced-level courses in a number of subject areas: Special Reconnaissance, Close Quarters Battle, Sniper, Breaching, and weapons employment. MSOS and advanced training courses: Advanced Linguist Course (ALC) MARSOF Advanced Sniper Course (MASC) MARSOF Close Quarters Battle Level II (MCQBL2) Marine Technical Surveillance Course (MTSC) MARSOF Dynamic Entry Level II Course (MDEL2) Tactical Acquisition Exploitation (SR level II) Hostile Forces Tagging Tracking Location (HFTTL) Helicopter Rope Suspension Training (HRST) Advanced EOD Joint Terminal Attack Controller (JTAC) Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Operator Advanced mountain warfare Advanced Driving Skills Survive, Evade, Resist and Escape (SERE) Marine special operators also attend U.S. Army Airborne School and the USMC Combatant Diver Course.
"Always Faithful, Always Forward"